Sam Fragoso's posts - Thai uPOST

Director Ira Sachs talks fatherhood, class warfare, and Little Men Director Ira Sachs talks fatherhood, class warfare, and Little Men

Before all else, Ira Sachs is a humanist filmmaker. Of course, most films are about people in one way or another, so perhaps that description fits anyone who steps behind the camera. But there’s something unexpectedly candid about the way Sachs presents human beings to his audience, in tenderly rendered but…

Jacques Audiard on Dheepan and how digital effects aren’t cinema Jacques Audiard on Dheepan and how digital effects aren’t cinema

French auteur Jacques Audiard follows a string a of critically acclaimed successes (A Prophet, Rust And Bone) with Dheepan, a melodrama planted firmly in reality, until it isn’t. Dabbling in magical melodrama, the film—which won the coveted Palme D’Or at 2015 Cannes Film Festival—tells the story of a Sri Lankan Tamil…

Joachim Trier loves all of his films like children, even the “shitty” ones Joachim Trier loves all of his films like children, even the “shitty” ones

There was no sophomore slump for Joachim Trier. In the annals of second features, his Oslo, August 31st may be one of the very best. Heartbreaking from beginning to end, the tragic drama told the story of a recovering addict attempting to start anew. Few films have captured the desperation of someone trying to press…

Green Room director Jeremy Saulnier on going punk and growing up Green Room director Jeremy Saulnier on going punk and growing up

A hardcore punk-rocker turned self-described “filmmaker, absentee father,” Jeremy Saulnier emerged on the independent film scene in 2007 with Murder Party, a low-budget horror-comedy infusion that flew under the radar. For Saulnier, his under-seen debut didn’t propel him in the direction he was hoping. In fact, the…

Gabriel Byrne on Miller’s Crossing, Dead Man, and The Usual Suspects Gabriel Byrne on Miller’s Crossing, Dead Man, and The Usual Suspects

Welcome to Random Roles, wherein we talk to actors about the characters who defined their careers. The catch: They don’t know beforehand what roles we’ll ask them to talk about.

Woody Allen wants a legacy, not a fan club Woody Allen wants a legacy, not a fan club

Every day, Watch This offers staff recommendations inspired by the week’s new releases or premieres. This week: Midnight Special pays inspired tribute to the work of both Steven Spielberg and John Carpenter. In its honor, we’re recommending excellent homages to other films and filmmakers.

Kelly Reichardt on the re-release of her debut and being mad as hell Kelly Reichardt on the re-release of her debut and being mad as hell

Kelly Reichardt is angry and always has been. Even as her ascendency in the world of independent cinema continues (with intimate, pensive gems like Old Joy, Meek’s Cutoff, and Night Moves), the Florida-born filmmaker refuses to be anything but apoplectic. Which is not the same as being unpleasant or ungrateful. She is…

Tom Courtenay and Andrew Haigh on monogamy, religion, and 45 Years Tom Courtenay and Andrew Haigh on monogamy, religion, and 45 Years

December has inexorably become the month that everyone, including this website, waxes hyperbolic about their favorite movies of the year. With The Force Awakens, The Hateful Eight, Joy, The Revenant, and a dozen other larger affairs being released this winter, it’s likely that something like Andrew Haigh’s 45 Years—a…

Frederick Wiseman on his new film and his dream of shooting in the White House Frederick Wiseman on his new film and his dream of shooting in the White House

Since 1967, Frederick Wiseman has been making extraordinary documentaries about the ordinary. His latest film, In Jackson Heights, is a meticulous, textured portrait of a Queens neighborhood in transition. For more than three hours, the inimitable documentarian captures moments of raw emotion, from emigrated families…

Audition director Takashi Miike wishes he could make Ted movies Audition director Takashi Miike wishes he could make Ted movies

As of today, the legendarily prolific Takashi Miike has nearly 100 directorial credits to his name on IMDB. It’s a staggering number of projects—and an amount that will likely increase by the time you finish reading this article. Born and raised on the outskirts of Osaka, Japan, Miike has produced a steady stream of…

Our interview with Mississippi Grind’s Ben Mendelsohn gets personal Our interview with Mississippi Grind’s Ben Mendelsohn gets personal

After three decades as a scene-stealing character actor, Ben Mendelsohn seems to be hitting his stride in 2015. From his dramatic turn in Slow West to his supporting role on the hit Netflix series Bloodline, the Australian-born performer no longer resides in the background. And with Mississippi Grind, Mendelsohn can…

Straight Outta Compton’s writer on meeting Suge Knight, negotiating fact and fiction Straight Outta Compton’s writer on meeting Suge Knight, negotiating fact and fiction

S. Leigh Savidge made his first of many cinematic splashes in 1986, when he founded Xenon Pictures. The company, still alive and well, is often heralded as being the first home entertainment label for “independent black audience films.” Those early years at Xenon involved the purchasing and repackaging of films from…

Josh Lucas on American Psycho, Russell Crowe, and the disastrous Poseidon set Josh Lucas on American Psycho, Russell Crowe, and the disastrous Poseidon set

Welcome to Random Roles, wherein we talk to actors about the characters who defined their careers. The catch: They don’t know beforehand what roles we’ll ask them to talk about.

Director Joe Swanberg on why he makes a movie like Digging For Fire every year Director Joe Swanberg on why he makes a movie like Digging For Fire every year

In this lifetime, each new year promises a few certainties: moronic Fox News hosts will continue to be moronic, some people will die, and a new Joe Swanberg movie will come out. His latest movie is entitled Digging For Fire, a shaggy drama that opens with married couple Tim (Jake Johnson) and Lee (Rosemarie DeWitt)…

Debra Granik on “poverty porn,” self-worth, and her new film, Stray Dog Debra Granik on “poverty porn,” self-worth, and her new film, Stray Dog

Unfettered by what Hollywood mandates these days (sequels, superheroes, stupidity), Debra Granik has built a career on verisimilitude—an admirable dedication to capturing the lives of people most movies ignore. Granik is interested in the Ozarks of Southern Missouri, where everything, as Ignatiy Vishnevetsky writes in…

Roy Andersson on the third installment of his “human” trilogy Roy Andersson on the third installment of his “human” trilogy

Every film, even Human Centipede III: More Shit, aims to unveil some sliver of humanity. However, most movies are not as explicit about this pursuit as A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence, Swedish director Roy Andersson’s poignant and sardonic conclusion to his trilogy “about being a human being.” (The…

Andrew Niccol on his new drone-warfare drama Good Kill Andrew Niccol on his new drone-warfare drama Good Kill

Over the past two decades, Andrew Niccol has written and directed six feature films. None of them revolve around a superhero, and none is a sequel, spin-off, or reboot. For better or worse, the New Zealand-born writer-director has yet to make a movie he hasn’t wanted to make. From genetics (Gattaca) to immortality (In…

The directors of Spring on shooting in Italy, meeting Linklater, and bending genre The directors of Spring on shooting in Italy, meeting Linklater, and bending genre

Directors Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead made their mark on the horror scene a couple of years ago with Resolution, an inspired meta-genre trifle that suggested promising careers to follow. With their sophomore effort, Spring, the budding auteurs have reaffirmed and built on the talent hinted at in their debut. Set…

Ellen Barkin on great directors and her favorite roles, from Diner to Buckaroo Banzai Ellen Barkin on great directors and her favorite roles, from Diner to Buckaroo Banzai

Welcome to Random Roles, wherein we talk to actors about the characters who defined their careers. The catch: They don’t know beforehand what roles we’ll ask them to talk about.

Selma’s David Oyelowo on the challenges of playing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Selma’s David Oyelowo on the challenges of playing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

David Oyelowo doesn’t simply play Dr. Martin Luther King in Ava DuVernay’s arresting and bold biopic Selma. He becomes King. Turning the myth into man a scene at a time, Oyelowo delivers one of the most evocative and powerful performances of the year, likely to garner some warranted Oscar attention come January.

More Sam Fragoso's posts »

Language